Larry Marion

Larry Marion is recognized as one of the world's leading authorities on rock and music memorabilia, especially concert posters. He has worked with many of the leading auction houses, set several world-record prices for Beatles memorabilia, and written and designed sixteen catalogs of music-related memorabilia. Larry is one of the owners, founders, and directors of NotFadeAwayGallery.com, which exclusively represents the photography of Bob Bonis. He lives in Brooklyn, New York, collects memorabilia related to stand-up comedy, and can be contacted at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Published in Authors

The Lost Beatles Photographs by Larry Marion

Lost Rolling Stones Photographs by Larry Marion

An intimate, revealing look at the legendary band, documented in a series of personal, never-before-seen photographs taken during The Beatles' three U.S. tours—the largest single trove of such important unknown rock photographs ever uncovered

In the early 1960s, four working-class lads from Liverpool invaded America, igniting a cultural revolution that would transform a generation and change the world. During that time, few were closer to The Beatles than Bob Bonis, the tour manager for all three U.S. tours, 1964, 1965, and 1966. While on the road with the Fab Four, Bonis, a passionate amateur photographer with a keen eye, an innate sense of composition, and a deep love for his subjects, snapped some nine hundred photographs of the band—a remarkable collection that until now has only been known to family and close friends.

Unearthed after forty-five years, the photos that comprise The Lost Beatles Photographs form a groundbreaking portrait of the most iconic band of the twentieth century at a pivotal time in their career, conquering America. Bonis's photos offer fans unprecedented, behind-the-scenes access to The Beatles during their breakthrough moments on the world stage, from rehearsing backstage to stellar performances in concert. Here are John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr in casual moments, in rehearsal, in concert, in dressing rooms, on vacation, at press events, on the road. Funny, surprising, provocative, beautiful, these photos recall an unforgettable period in history and offer a fresh look at these legends at the beginning of their fame.

Whether you're a devoted aficionado or just discovering the Fab Four, The Lost Beatles Photographs is a remarkable addition to Beatle lore and a must-have for every fan.

Published in Coffee Table

The Lost Rolling Stone Photographs by Larry Marion

Lost Rolling Stones Photographs by Larry Marion

A revealing look at the earliest days of the legendary band, captured in a collection of personal, never-before-seen photographs—the largest single trove of such important rock images ever uncovered .

When they first came to America in June of 1964, The Rolling Stones had been together for only two years and were almost completely unknown to U.S. audiences. They often played on bills with a variety of other artists, not necessarily as the headlining act, and often received lukewarm receptions. Many of these earliest U.S. shows did not sell out. But in the years that Bob Bonis photographed them, The Stones went from unknowns to one of the most prominent bands in the world.

Documented in these photos is this seminal period when The Stones made their transformation into the world's greatest rock 'n' roll band. And during that time, few were closer to The Stones than Bob Bonis, the tour manager for their U.S. tours between 1964 and 1966. While on the road with The Stones, Bonis, a passionate amateur photographer with a keen eye, an innate sense of composition, and a deep love for his subjects, snapped some 2,700 photographs of the band—a remarkable collection that until now has only been known to family and close friends.

Onstage, offstage, and behind-the-scenes, these stunning photographs show The Stones in an entirely new light—intimate and unguarded. Here are Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones, Charlie Watts, Ian Stewart, and Bill Wyman in casual moments, in rehearsal, in concert, in dressing rooms, on vacation, on the road. Funny, surprising, provocative, beautiful, these photos recall an unforgettable period in history and offer a fresh look at these soon-to-be legends at the beginning of their fame. This was the point at which early manager Andrew Loog Oldham began to position the band as the antidote to The Beatles—troublemakers dressed in leather and singing about the dark side of relationships.

Comprised of images unearthed after forty-five years, The Lost Rolling Stones Photographs is a groundbreaking portrait of one of the most iconic bands of the twentieth century.

Published in Coffee Table